Tag Archive | bebook neo

How to De-Authorize Your eReader in Adobe Digital Editions

In this post I’ll be giving you step-by-step instructions on how to de-authorize your eReader in Adobe Digital Editions. You might want to do this if you want to change the Adobe ID that you have associated with your device.

In these instructions I’ll be using my BeBook Neo because that is the type of e-Ink eReader that I happen to own at the moment, but the process should work for any E-Ink style eReader device that Adobe supports for authorization. (Just like my post for authorizing your device, this doesn’t apply to Android or iOS — just eReaders.)

Note: This will only work if your device has been authorized with an Adobe ID in the past. If you never did that, these instructions simply won’t do anything.

Instructions

1. Start with your eReader turned off and disconnected from the computer. Also start with Adobe Digital Editions closed. This will help prevent any issues with ADE recognizing the device.

2. Connect your eReader to your computer with its USB cable.

3. Turn on the eReader.

4. When my BeBook Neo detects that it is plugged into the computer, it asks me if I want to connect to the computer. Tapping ‘NO’ would just allow it to charge. Tapping ‘YES’ lets you transfer files to its memory and perform other functions related to the computer, so tap YES.

5. Open Adobe Digital Editions on your computer.

6. On your keyboard, simultaneously press the Ctrl, Shift, and E buttons, and then let go. (ctrl-shift-E). This should give you this prompt:

7. Click the ‘Deauthorize’ button.

How to Authorize Your eReader for Adobe Digital Editions

In this post I’ll show you step-by-step instructions for how to authorize (or re-authorize, if you’ve previously de-authorized) your eReader for Adobe Digital Editions. This is something that is necessary to do if you’re going to be buying and reading PDF or ePub ebooks that are protected by Adobe’s DRM.

Before starting this process, you’ll need an Adobe ID. If you don’t already have one, get one here. You should also authorize your computer before you start authorizing other devices.

BIG IMPORTANT WARNING: If you already have an Adobe ID and you even slightly suspect that you might have used it for ebooks in the past, don’t create a new Adobe ID. Keep using the one you already have. If you don’t remember your login details, use the links on the sign-in page that say “Did you forget your Adobe ID?” / “Did you forget your password?”

Instructions

The device I’m using in these instructions is a BeBook Neo. These instructions should work for any similar device like a Sony Reader, Nook, Kobo, Cybook, etc. You can see a list of the devices that Adobe supports on their website here. (Update for clarification: The instructions in this post only apply to E-Ink screen style eReader devices, not Android tablets, iOS devices, or other smartphones).

1. Start with your eReader turned off and disconnected from the computer. Also start with Adobe Digital Editions closed. This will help prevent any issues with ADE recognizing the device.

2. Connect your eReader to your computer with its USB cable.

3. Turn on the eReader.

4. When my BeBook Neo detects that it is plugged into the computer, it asks me if I want to connect to the computer. Tapping ‘NO’ would just allow it to charge. Tapping ‘YES’ lets you transfer files to its memory and perform other functions related to the computer, so tap YES. Your eReader might have a similar prompt.

5. Open Adobe Digital Editions on your computer. It should automatically detect your eReader. If your eReader is not currently authorized, you’ll get a prompt like this:

Adobe Digital Editions already knew my Adobe ID from when I authorized my computer, so it just tells me to authorize with the same ID (which is usually the smartest thing to do). If your computer and device had never been authorized, then it should give you a login screen where you enter the email address that you used to create your Adobe ID and your password.

Note: See the “Don’t ask again for this device” in the bottom-left? DON’T CLICK THAT. If you do it’ll be a pain to re-authorize the device in the future if you need to.

So at this point you can either fill in your Adobe ID login information, or accept the ID it detected for you, and click ‘Authorize Device’. Upon success you’ll see this:

That’s it! Now you can transfer purchased content from your computer to your device.

eReader News

As I’ve mentioned before, this blog is mostly about software but sometimes I think it’s useful to write about related hardware. (Generally only hardware that can run ebook software, such as eReaders, tablets, and mobile phones.)

There have recently been some new eReaders released and some price drops that I wanted to share with you.

Kindle with Special Offers

This is old news already, but Amazon has released a new version of the Kindle called “Kindle with Special Offers”. It’s the same as the Kindle WiFi model, but $25 less at $114. Coupons and discounts are displayed in the form of screen savers and along the bottom of the home screen. They are designed to not interrupt your reading at all.

Depending on the offers, they might actually be useful for you. You can get discounts on Kindle ebooks, Amazon Gift Cards, and other products sold at Amazon like HDTVs, for example.

Personally, I don’t know whether I’d get this model or not. It could end up saving you some money if you wanted the offers being given. Or it could just end up being annoying. One of the things I like about reading a book is that it is not online, and not involved in ads.

Nook Touch

Barnes & Noble has released a new version of the Nook: a smaller device with a touch screen. It’s available for pre-order right now, and the price is $139.

My impression is that this Nook is aimed at non-techy people. Its almost-square size makes it cute, and they seem to be really pushing it as an easy to use device. This is in contrast to the Nook color, which they’re billing as “the reader’s tablet” since it runs on the Android OS and even now has apps available.

Meanwhile, the original Nook has been pushed to the bottom of the screen, called the “NOOK 1st Edition”, and has had its price dropped to $119.

The Nook Touch looks like a fun eReader, especially for those who don’t want a tablet. It’s a good price, too.

Kobo eReader Touch

Similarly, Kobo now has a touch-screen version available. It’s also more square than the older models, but not as much as the Nook Touch. It has WiFi and all of the other features that the other Kobo eReaders have. It is available for pre-order from Borders for $129 (and other retailers).

The page of specs says that it comes with 15 ebook previews for free. I wonder if that means it does not come with the 100 free pre-loaded books like the older Kobo models. That was one of the things I found most endearing to the Kobo company.

Kobo also now has a “Reading Life” app, which apparently tracks your reading habits, lets you share things on Facebook, and earn rewards. Sounds kind of like one of those grocery store clubs to me, and I wonder if they will mostly be using it to gather data on what to sell you. But it could be interesting in any case.

BeBook Sales

Both the BeBook Neo and BeBook Club eReaders have gone on sale at eBookMall.com. The Neo has dropped down to $199 and the Club to $169. Plus the Club now comes with a free case, which they say is a $30 value.

I have a BeBook Neo and I like it quite a lot, especially with ePub ebooks. The Neo does have a touch screen, but it’s not the finger-swiping kind. It comes with a stylus that you use to tap on the screen. It was released before these touch screens became as popular as they are now. The stylus method that it has works well enough because it at least means that you don’t have to navigate through the screens with the buttons.

I don’t know as much about the Club, but it does have all of the same features that are now standard on eReaders, and it was designed to cost less than the Neo.

All of this activity in the eReader department makes me wonder if my previous impression of the market was incorrect. It might turn out that there are plenty of folks who want a dedicated e-reading device, and don’t want a full tablet. Either way, I am glad to see that there is still so much interest in eReaders, and that people are reading in general.

%d bloggers like this: