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The End of Microsoft Reader

Microsoft has announced that it will be discontinuing Microsoft Reader. If you go to the main Microsoft Reader website right now, you’ll see a short message.

Discontinuation of Microsoft Reader

It says: “Microsoft is discontinuing Microsoft Reader effective August 30, 2012, which includes download access of the Microsoft Reader application from the Microsoft Reader website. However, customers may continue to use and access the Microsoft Reader application and any .lit materials on their PCs or devices after the discontinuation on August 30, 2012. New content for purchase from retailers in the .lit format will be discontinued on November 8, 2011.”

Why? … My Opinion

This is a result of the ebook industry growing and developing. eBooks have been around for many years, but have grown in popularity over the past few. During that time, e-Ink e-readers have become very popular, and now tablets seem to be taking it to the next step. These devices use PDF and ePub files, except for the Kindle, which uses its own special format.

Before this surge of e-reader and tablet usage, ebooks were generally read on computer screens and PDA-style devices like older Palms and Pocket PCs, along with some older e-readers like the Franklin eBookMan and Gemstar eBook. After smartphones became available, some folks with a pioneering spirit read ebooks on those small screens. During this time there were many ebook formats available, and Microsoft Reader one was one of those. It was mostly used on Windows PCs and Pocket PCs (which later became Windows Mobile).

I always liked Microsoft Reader as an ebook format. It provided a much more “book-like” feeling than PDF files. The design of the reader, the color of the pages, the Clear-Type of the text, all made the reading experience feel like a paper book.

But now we have e-Ink e-readers like the Nook, Kobo, BeBook, Sony Reader, etc, as well as tablets. Microsoft Reader can not be used on any of these devices, and as a result, fewer and fewer people have been using Microsoft Reader. My understanding is that Microsoft only made money on Microsoft Reader ebooks when they were sold with DRM. They were paid a small percentage of each sale for the use of the DRM technology. It is likely that this just became too low that developing new versions of Microsoft Reader and providing support for it no longer made any sense.

How will this affect ebook users?

Their official message pretty much tells you everything you need to know. You will be able to download Microsoft Reader until August 20th, 2012. That means you have a year left to download it if you need to.

You will only be able to buy new Microsoft Reader ebooks through November 8, 2011. I suspect that book publishers will immediately stop publishing their books in Microsoft Reader format. I certainly would if I were a publisher. No need to create content in a format that will soon be completely obsolete. Likewise, my guess is that ebook retailers will start phasing out the format very quickly, especially if there will be no new content published.

So what does that mean for you if you currently have ebooks in Microsoft Reader format? My recommendation is to make sure that you download the latest version of Microsoft Reader so that it will last as long as possible for you. If you need to re-download any of your past purchases, do that right away before the option is no longer available. Then, make backups of the files.

Be aware of DRM. If you had to activate Microsoft Reader with a Passport or Windows Live ID, that means that you won’t easily be able to copy the files from one computer to another. Make sure that you’ve got all of your computers and Windows Mobile devices activated with the same Windows Live ID. That will increase your chances of being able to use the ebooks on each of your devices. You could even make a small notepad .txt note with your Windows Live ID (and password, if you want) and store it in the same folder where you store your Microsoft Reader ebooks, just to make sure that you remember. Take care of this long before the end dates arrive.

I view this as a good sign. It means that the ebook industry as a whole has developed far enough that one of the mainstream formats has dropped away. This means we’re closer to a universal ebook format, which will make life much easier for users.

eReader

eReaderThe eReader program has undergone some changes in ownership and names over the years. It used to be heavily associated with Palm, being called “Palm Reader” then “Palm eReader,” and now it simply goes by “eReader”. (In fact, if you install it on Windows, it will go in a folder called Palm Digital Media.) Its website shows that it was bought by Barnes & Noble at some point, and it is now run by the same people that operate Fictionwise.

eReader is another versatile program, like Mobipocket, that can be used on many different types of devices.

devices supported

As of October 2010, this is a list of the device types that are supported by eReader:

  • Android
  • Symbian
  • iPhone and iPod Touch
  • Windows Mobile
  • Blackberry
  • Pocket PC 2002&earlier, 2003&later
  • Windows
  • Macintosh
  • Linux
  • OQO

software wizard

The main eReader download page lets you choose which device you have, then download the software you need. They also have a clever software wizard that helps you decide.

drm

The DRM that eReader employs is quite easy to work with. Instead of making you register for an account and authorize the software, you just enter two “unlock codes” when you open the ebook: your name and your credit card number.

At first, the idea of entering your credit card number sounds strange and even scary for some people, but if you think about it from a DRM standpoint, it makes perfect sense. If a person gave away the ebook to a friend, he would also have to give away his credit card number so that the friend could open the ebook. Following that reasoning, if this person went further and posted the ebook on a torrent site, he’d have to give his credit card number away to everyone on the internet.

A tip about the name: in my experience I have noticed that some people get confused about how exactly they should be entering their name. The name you enter should match up with whatever you registered on the website where you bought the ebook. The confusion that arises is that this is not necessarily the exact name that is shown on your credit card. So, don’t enter the name as shown on your credit card. Enter the name that you gave to the retail website when making your purchase. The ebook doesn’t know what’s printed on your credit card.

free eReader books

eReader has a list of free ebooks that you can download. That gives you a good opportunity to test out the software on your device to see if you like it before you purchase anything. However, you do have to register an account and verify a real credit card number for the free ebooks.

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